Slower Thinking

I like to and am able to move to many types of music and I also love to be in synchrony with Andy. He doesn’t have the ability to adjust to the variety of music life presents and so it is up to me to move with him to the music he hears, if I want to dance with him.

I think everyone has experienced frustration when technology runs slower than we are used to.

Waiting for directions to load on a phone, especially while traveling and when there is a slow connection, can be a test of patience. When I make a sale at the art show with the commonly used sales app, Square, there are always customers who become impatient because I don’t offer “Apple Pay” where the process could be completed with one swipe of their Apple watch onto my phone.

I remind them that the time I’ll take to complete the sale is only about 45 seconds (I’ve measured it) compared to 5 seconds using their watch.

I say, “I know 45 seconds can seem like forever standing here waiting for your receipt but we could talk to each other or take a couple deep breaths while we wait.” Often my words will bring a smile- especially because we are in such pleasant circumstances at the art show and surrounded by extraordinary handmade beauty all around.

Slower thinking in Parkinson’s can be successfully navigated.

For many Parkinson’s patients, the world moves faster than they can keep up with. I’ve noticed that pace and rhythm in life is always changing. Our world seems to value speed more than quality in many instances.

Parkinson’s is a slow disease.

One thinks more slowly and moves more slowly. Even Andy’s neurologist, a loving, kind and brilliant doctor talked very quickly when she examined Andy the other day. Her pace was familiar to me and I concentrated and followed along. She is a professional with a lot to do and although she’d never cut corners, if she speeds up she might have a chance to complete all the work in her day.

“Dr. Sarah, could you please slow down,” I request. “I don’t think Andy can follow.”

It’s like I popped a balloon.

She apologized, looking into Andy’s eyes.

We are all susceptible to matching the pace of the world, but if you have Parkinson’s or take care of one who lives with Parkinson’s, there are opportunities to match a slower way of being and to receive benefits from that choice.

The pace of life is like dancing. One must follow the music and the music changes all the time.  A great dancer can adjust.

In my life with Andy, 20 years with Parkinson’s, I am always making choices.

I like to and am able to move to many types of music and I also love to be in synchrony with Andy. He doesn’t have the ability to adjust to the variety of music life presents and so it is up to me to move with him to the music he hears, if I want to dance with him.

This entire blog can be summed up with one word- trust.

I trust that Andy is doing his best with what he has and he trusts me to dance this life with him as best as I am able to.

Slow thinking is only an impediment if others won’t wait.

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